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Backup your GNU/Linux system with CrashPlan

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Backup, backup, backup...This is the biggest thing that I wish everyone would follow when messing around with your computer, regardless of operating system but especially with GNU/Linux.

GNU/Linux is fairly stable nowadays, but anyone who uses it regularly knows that this can change in the blink of an eye, and so...backup!

There are plenty of different ways to backup your system, but one that I have found very easy to use is a piece of software called CrashPlan. CrashPlan is one of very few user-friendly graphical tools to create backups, and it does it’s job well. CrashPlan is available for Windows,Linux, and MacOS.

Installation of CrashPlan

CrashPlan Extraction

Installing CrashPlan is fairly straightforward:

  • Arch / Manjaro users can install it via the AUR, and other distribution users can install it manually. Visit https://www.crashplan.com/en-us/thankyou/?os=linux – your download will start automatically.
  • Next, we extract the archive:tar -xf CrashPlan_4.8.2_Linux.tgz
  • And then we run the installation script: ./install.sh
  • Follow the on screen instructions and install away!

There are some notes included in a ReadMe file that I’ll paste here, that you should be aware of:

Installation Notes:

  • The CrashPlan app uses the Oracle Java<TM> Runtime Environment (JRE) to run. If you do not have a compatible Oracle JRE installed, the installation script downloads and installs it alongside CrashPlan. This does not overwrite your system's installed Java.
  • Once installed, the CrashPlan app can be launched by using the command 'CrashPlanDesktop', which is linked from a directory chosen during installation (default: /usr/local/bin/CrashPlanDesktop).
  • The CrashPlan service is installed and configured to run from a directory chosen during installation (default: etc/init.d/crashplan) and linked from '/etc/rc2.d'.
  • On some Linux distributions, you may need to add the following to '/etc/init.d/boot.local': /etc/init.d/crashplan start

Starting up CrashPlan and backing up the system

CrashPlan Home Screen

One CrashPlan was installed, because my OS uses SystemD I had to start the service a little differently:

  • sudo systemctl start crashplan.service
  • sudo systemctl enable crashplan.service

Once that is done, start up CrashPlan either via your applications menu, or via terminal by typing CrashPlanDesktop

Once the application has started, you’ll need to register a free account which only takes a brief moment, and then we can get started.

CrashPlan has numerous options for where to backup your system, and includes a 30 day free trial giving you the option to backup your system to the CrashPlan Central remote servers.

You can check out the feature comparison of free and subscription-based CrashPlan accounts here.

The core differences are:

  • Pro users get unlimited online storage space for backup, free users may only back up locally or offsite to other computers.
  • Pro plan support multiple backup sets, and back up continuously (free once daily).
  • Pro plan retains unlimited file versions, and supports web browser and mobile app access, and web browser restore.

However, you also have some other options at your disposal which are always free:

  • Back up your system to a friends computer
  • Back up your system to another machine of your own
  • Back up your system to a local folder or removable drive

The idea of using a friends computer is pretty neat I have to say. I, for example, fix numerous friends machines on a regular basis and so having them back up their systems to my machines could be handy, so if they break something I can restore their system, and they know that I have a copy of their system for safekeeping. This is done by using a code that is given from one friend to another, entered into the application, and then starting the backup.

The method of backing up to “Another computer” is pretty straightforward too; simply sign into the other machine with the same email address used for CrashPlan, and then select that second computer from the list of computers inside CrashPlan, and start the backup.

Overall, I highly recommend it, it’s fairly fast at what it does, and is extremely straightforward and user-friendly with very little configuration needed!

What about you? How do you back up your files?

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The post Backup your GNU/Linux system with CrashPlan appeared first on gHacks Technology News.

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CarlEdman
10 days ago
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Excellent choice if you have some tech skills. I've backed up my NAS (used storage about 10 TBytes) to Crashplan for years at a cost of about $4/month.
Falls Church, Virginia, USA
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Tee Hee

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Writer not quite thinking here:

In 2015, the Hairpin posted a handwritten letter (complete with drawings) by Tricia Louvar that tallied the price of one J.Crew “everyday” outfit to $596, together with a list of other things she could by for that amount, such as a nonstop flight from San Francisco to Honolulu.

Where are you going to stop between SF and Hawaii?

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CarlEdman
22 days ago
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Atlanta, usually.
Falls Church, Virginia, USA
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Mad Marx: The Class Warrior

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CarlEdman
37 days ago
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So true! All of the world's problems could be solved by Marx(ists) killing more of their opponents.
Falls Church, Virginia, USA
quad
37 days ago
Your irony game is so strong.
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2 public comments
rraszews
37 days ago
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Karl Marx of the Wasteland headshotting Ayn Rand is the single most beautiful thought I have ever been gifted with.
rclatterbuck
37 days ago
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I'd watch it

Digital Privacy at the U.S Border

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"Digital Privacy at the U.S Border: A New How-To Guide from EFF"
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CarlEdman
110 days ago
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Falls Church, Virginia, USA
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The polity that is California

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From a recent UCLA email:

Dear Colleagues:

As indicated in the attached letter from UCOP, Governor Brown signed into law AB 1887 which prohibits state-funded travel to a state that has passed a law that (1) authorizes discrimination based on sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression, or (2) voids or repeals existing state or local protections against such discrimination. The law expressly identifies the University of California as an entity covered by the law.

As of the date of this notice, the States of Kansas, Mississippi, North Carolina and Tennessee are on the prohibited travel list. The list of states may be updated on the Attorney General’s website found here: https://oag.ca.gov/ab1887.

Please note that the law does not prohibit travel that is paid for or reimbursed using non-state funds.

File under “Blue state overreach,” a growing dossier.  How about not discriminating against people — co-authors, conference organizers, etc. — on the basis of the states they live in and the polities which rule over them?

For the pointer I thank E.

The post The polity that is California appeared first on Marginal REVOLUTION.

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CarlEdman
161 days ago
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Of course not. That wouls be racist and/or cultural imperialism.
Falls Church, Virginia, USA
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ahofer
161 days ago
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I bet they wouldn't stop travel to Iran, Saudi Arabia, China,Cuba, or a host of African nations.
Princeton, NJ or NYC

China WeChat fact of the day

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WeChat’s ability to create a bustling payments economy echoes the general success of its parent company. In September, Tencent became China’s largest company by value, surpassing state-owned China Mobile, when it reported its third-quarter revenue: $6 billion, up 52% year over year. How much of that can be attributed to Wallet and WePay was not specified: WeChat, China’s most popular messaging app, makes money largely from online gaming, advertising, and selling sticker packs. But Tencent—which began with the instant messaging app QQ and is now pursuing artificial intelligence and electric cars alongside investments in a range of companies, including China’s dominant ride-sharing operation, Didi Chuxing—did cite WePay as a major reason for its “other” businesses’ growth, which increased $726 million in the third quarter, or 348% over the same period last year. According to estimates by HSBC, based on current tech company valuations, WeChat could already be worth more than $80 billion, about half of Tencent’s market capitalization.

That is from Eveline Chao at Fast Company, and for the pointer I thank Dan Wang.  The article offers other points of interest.

The post China WeChat fact of the day appeared first on Marginal REVOLUTION.

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CarlEdman
173 days ago
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Largest company in China has quarterly revenue of only $6b? That is pathetic. Companies like ExxonMobil have quarterly revenues more than an order of magnitude larger. Yeah, trajectory and all that, but still.
Falls Church, Virginia, USA
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